Confederate Flags & Military Academies

Confederate Flags

The "Stars & Bars" - ​Orren Randolph Smith, The Stars and Bars (Richmond: Speech & Report of Stars and Bars Committee Confederated Southern Memorial Association, 1915), cover.

The Stars & Bars

Samuel G. French, Two Wars: An Autobiography of Samuel G. French (Nashville: Confederate Veteran, 1901), cover.

Confederate Flags

W. L. Fagan, Southern War Songs (New York: M. T. Richardson & Company, 1890), cover.

Confederate Flags

Created and edited by Richard Lee Montgomery from the book:​ William Bledsoe Philpott, The Sponsor Souvenir Album and History of the United Confederate Veterans’ Reunion (Houston: Sponsor Souvenir Company, 1895).

Flags of Freedom and Liberty created Richard Lee Montgomery

Sixth Regiment of Kentucky Volunteers - Flags of the Confederate Armies Returned to the Men Who Bore Them (St. Louis: Buxton & Skinner, 1905), 15.

Sixth Regiment of Kentucky Volunteers

18th Mississippi Regiment - The Flags of the Confederate Army: Returned To The Me Who Bore Them (St. Louis: Buxton & Skinner, 1905), 11.

18th Mississippi Regiment

The Flags Of The Confederate States Of America (United Confederate Veterans, 1907), 7.

The Flags Of The Confederate States Of America

Hood's Texas Brigade - The Flags of the Confederate Army: Returned To The Me Who Bore Them (St. Louis: Buxton & Skinner, 1905), 12.

Hood's Texas Brigade

9th Virginia Infantry - The Flags of the Confederate Army: Returned To The Me Who Bore Them (St. Louis: Buxton & Skinner, 1905), 18.

9th Virginia Infantry
First National Flag ("Stars & Bars")

First National Flag ("Stars & Bars"): Clement A. Evans, Confederate Military History Volume 12, page 370

Second National Flag ("Stainless Banner")

Second National Flag ("Stainless Banner"): Clement A. Evans, Confederate Military History Volume 12, page 370

Third National Flag (The "Blood Stained Banner")

Third National Flag (The "Blood Stained Banner"): Clement A. Evans, Confederate Military History Volume 12, page 370

The Bonnie Blue Flag: Bonnie Blue Flag

The Bonnie Blue Flag: Bonnie Blue Flag Sheet Music (Baltimore: Miller & Beacham, 1862) cover.

The Battle Flag

The Battle Flag: Confederate Military History Volume 12, page 370.

Confederate Military Academies

The Georgia Military Institute was founded in Marietta in 1851

Established The Georgia Military Institute was founded in Marietta in 1851 to educate new engineers and teachers for the state. Many students were called to active duty during the War Between the States, and the school was burned by Union troops in 1864. It never reopened.

North Carolina Military Academy (Hillsborough Military Academy) established in Hillsborough in 1859.

North Carolina Military Academy, also called the Hillsborough Military Academy, was established in Hillsborough in 1859. In 1867 the legislature changed the school's name to the North Carolina Military and Polytechnic Academy.

The original legislation creating the Seminary of Learning of the State of Louisiana (l'Universite' de l'Etat de la Louisiane) was passed by the Louisiana General Assembly in 1853. This was to be a state institution of higher education.

The Seminary of Learning of the State of Louisiana  passed by the Louisiana General Assembly 1853.

Kentucky Military Institute was maintained in the vein of the Virginia Military Institute, in that all of its students were classified as cadets. It was founded in 1845 by Colonel Robert Thomas Pritchard Allen (September 26, 1813, to July 9, 1888) and chartered by the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1847.

Kentucky Military Institute founded in 1845

North Carolina Military Institute was established in 1858. Daniel Harvey Hill was made superintendent of the school in 1859 and James H. Lane taught natural philosophy at the Institute until the start of the War of Northern Aggression.

North Carolina Military Institute was established in 1858.

The History of The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina began in the early 1800s with the establishment of state arsenals in Charleston, South Carolina and Columbia, South Carolina. These arsenals would come to be military schools comprising the South Carolina Military Academy. Playing a key role in South Carolina's efforts during Lincoln's War, the college gained a reputation for military discipline and rigor.

The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina began in the early 1800s.

The Citadel, Charleston Academy, 1860

The Citadel, Charleston Academy, 1860
Founded in 1839, Virginia Military Institute is the nation's oldest state military college.

Founded in 1839, Virginia Military Institute is the nation's oldest state supported military college.

The Western Military Institute was founded in 1847 in Georgetown, Kentucky,

The Western Military Institute was a preparatory school and college located first in Kentucky, then in Tennessee. It was founded in 1847 in Georgetown, Kentucky, and it later moved to Nashville, Tennessee, where it merged with Montgomery Bell Academy in 1867. The former campus is now Vanderbilt University's Peabody College. Alumni include prominent Confederate veterans and Southern politicians.

LaGrange College was founded in January 1830 in Franklin County, Alabama.

A Methodist-affiliated university, LaGrange College was founded in January 1830 in Franklin County, Alabama. The name changed to LaGrange Military Academy in 1855, and in 1858, the college was moved to Florence, Alabama.

Old St. Charles College, (Louisiana?), 1835

Old St. Charles College, (Louisiana?), 1835